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Healing Multi-Academy Trust

Woodlands Academy

Spelling Lists

Each week, your child will get their own spelling sheet with an activity page and the 'look, cover, write, check' practice page. All spellings sheets are collected in on the Friday in preparation for our weekly spelling test. Please encourage your child to practice their spellings at home. You could test your child throughout the week or use the spelling shed app (see link in Spelling file). All children have their very own log in inside their reading record. Any issues, do not hesitate to speak to me. 

WC 10.05.21

 

Group 1: The long voewel oo and yoo sounds soekt as u-e.

June

rude

tube

flume

huge

rule

use

tune

flute

plume

 

Group 2: The ar digraph

car

park

garden

dark

army

jar

arm

hard

stars

yard

WC 03.05.21

 

Group 1: The long vowel sound /o/ spelled with the split digraph o-e.

 

home

woke

hole

spoke

bone

those

hope

mole

joke

phone

 

Group 2: The long /a/ vowel sound spelled ’ei.’

 

vein 

weigh

eight

neighbour

sleigh

reign

freight

reins

veil

eighteen

 

WC 29.03.21

 

Group 1: The long vowel sound /i/ spelled with a split digraph i-e.

five

like

side

spike

fire

ride

time

slide

trike

mice

 

Group 2: The long vowel /a/ sound spelled ‘ai’

straight

painter

fainted

waist

strainer

chained

claimed

failure

snail

waiter

WC 22.03.21 

 

Group 1: he long vowel sound /e/ spelled with the split digraph e-e.

even

theme

these

evening

eve

delete

Chinese

complete

athlete

extreme

 

Group 2: Challenge words

centre

decide

disappear

early

heart

learn

minute

notice

regular

therefore

 

WC 15.03.21

 

Group 1: The long vowel sound /a/ spelled with the split digraph a-e.

made

same

take

plate

mistake

came

rake

safe

awake

snowflake

 

Group 2: Adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words of more than one syllable.

forgetting

forgotten

beginning

preferred

permitted

regretting

committed

forbidden

propelled

equipped

 

 

WC 30.11.20

 

Group 1: The ‘ay’ and ‘oy’ digraphs. These digraphs are used for those sounds at the ends of words and syllables.

 

day

say

stay

toy

joy

play

way

clay

joy

cowboy

 

Group 2: Adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words of more than one syllable. The consonant letter is not doubled if the syllable is unstressed.

 

gardening 

gardened

limited

limiting

developing 

developed

listening

listened

covered

covering

WC 23.11.20

 

Group 1: The /ai/ and /oi/ digraphs. These digraphs are virtually never used at the end of words in English.

 

rain

train

afraid

join

point

wait

paid

oil

coin

soil

 

Group 2: The prefix ’mis-’ This is another prefix with negative meanings.

 

misbehave

mislead

misspell

mistake

misplace

misread

mistrust

misunderstanding

misuse

mislaid

 

WC 16.11.20

 

Group 1: Words of more than one syllable often have an unstressed syllable in which the vowel sound is unclear. Sometimes words can be joined together to form compound words.

pocket

rabbit

carrot

thunder

sunset

football

playground

farmyard

bedroom

blackberry

 

 

Group 2: The prefix ’dis-’ which has a negative meaning.  It often means ‘does not’ as in does not agree = disagree.

disappoint

disagree

disobey

disable

dislike

dislocate

disappear

disadvantage

disapprove

dislodge

WC 09.11.20

 

Year 3

Group 1: Adding –er and –est to adjectives and the prefix un-.

fresher

quicker

higher

hardest

darkest 

unhappy

undo

unload

unfair

unlock

 

Group 2: Words with the prefix ’re-’   ‘re-’ means ‘again’ or ‘back.’

redo

refresh

return

reappear

decorate

revenge

review

replay

reaction

rebound

WC 19.10.20

 

Year 3

Group 1: Adding the endings -ing and -ed to verbs. If the verb ends in two consonant letters (the same or different), the ending is simply added on.

hunting 

buzzing

jumping

walking

shouting 

hunted

buzzed

jumped

walked

shouted

 

Group 2: Challenge words

actual

answer

bicycle

circle

earth

enough 

fruit

island

often 

popular

 

Year 4: Challenge words

calendar

appear

believe

grammar

increase

interest

opposite

straight

opposite

striaght

strength

women

 

WC 12.10.20

 

Year 3

Group 1: Adding s and es to words (plurals). If the ending sounds like /s/ or /z/, it is spelled as –s. If it forms an extra syllable, then it is spelled as –es.

 

flowers

boxes

lunches

apples

beaches

trees

dishes

dogs

peaches

clouds

 

Group 2: Words with endings that sound like /ch/ is often spelt –’ture’ unless the root word ends in (t)ch.

 

creature

furniture

picture

nature

adventure

capture

future

sculpture

fracture

mixture

 

Year 4: The prefix ‘inter-’ means between, amongst or during. 

interact

intercity

international

interfere

interview

intercept

intercom

internet

interchange

interface

WC: 05:10:20

 

Group 1: The /v/ sound at the end of words. English words hardly ever end with the letter v, so if a word ends with a /v/ sound, the letter e usually needs to be added after the v.

very

happy

funny

party

family

give

have

love

five

save

 

 

Group 2: Words with endings that sound like /ze/, as in measure, are always spelled with 'sure'.

measure

treasure 

pleasure

enclosure

displeasure

composure

leisure

exposure

closure

disclosure

 

Group 3: The prefix ‘sub-’ which means under or below.

submarine

subject

subway

submerge

subtropical

subdivide

subheading

substandard

subtitle

submit

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